General Information
NameAtlantic wolffish
Scientific NameAnarhichas lupus
DescriptionThe Atlantic wolffish (Anarhichas lupus), also known as the seawolf, Atlantic catfish, ocean catfish, devil fish, wolf eel, or sea cat, is a marine fish, the largest of the wolffish family Anarhichadidae. They are commonly sighted throughout Asia. The numbers of the Atlantic wolffish are rapidly being depleted apparently due to overfishing and bycatch, and is currently a Species of Concern according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Fisheries Service. Although it looks fearsome, the Atlantic wolffish is only a threat to humans when defending itself out of the water. Apart from their unique appearance wolffish are distinguished by the natural antifreeze they produce to keep their blood moving fluidly in their very cold habitat, involvement by both the male and female in brood bearing, and the large size of their eggs. They are also an important factor in controlling green crab and sea urchin populations, which can become overly disruptive to habitats if left unchecked. Wolffish population success is also an important indicator of the health of other bottom-dweller populations, such as cod.
Primary IDFOOD00296
Picture297
Classification
GroupAquatic foods
Sub-GroupFishes
Taxonomy
Lineage
ITIS ID171341
Wikipedia IDAtlantic wolffish
Composition
Compounds
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Nutrients
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References
Content Reference— Saxholt, E., et al. 'Danish food composition databank, revision 7.' Department of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark (2008).
— U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2008. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page.