General Information
NameSugar apple
Scientific NameAnnona squamosa
DescriptionSugar-apple is the fruit of Annona squamosa, the most widely grown species of Annona and a native of the tropical Americas and West Indies. The fruit is round to conical, 5?10 cm (2.0?3.9 in) in diameter and 6?10 cm (2.4?3.9 in) long, and weighing 100?240 g (3.5?8.5 oz), with a thick rind composed of knobby segments. The color is typically pale green to blue-green, with a deep pink blush in certain varieties, and typically has a bloom. It is unique among Annona fruits in being segmented, and the segments tend to separate when ripe, exposing the interior. The flesh is fragrant and sweet, creamy white to light yellow, and resembles and tastes like custard. It is found adhering to 13?16 mm (0.51?0.63 in) long seeds to form individual segments arranged in a single layer around the conical core. It is soft, slightly grainy, and slippery. The hard, shiny seeds may number 20-38 or more per fruit, and have a brown to black coat, although varieties exist that are almost seedless.
Picture496
Classification
GroupFruits
Sub-GroupTropical fruits
Taxonomy
Lineage
ITIS ID18100
Wikipedia IDSugar_apple
Composition
Compounds
CompoundStructureContent Range AverageReference
CompoundReference
Nutrients
NutrientContent Range AverageReference
NutrientReference
References
Content Reference— Duke, James. 'Dr. Duke's Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases. United States Department of Agriculture.' Agricultural Research Service, Accessed April 27 (2004).
— U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2008. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page.
— Shinbo, Y., et al. 'KNApSAcK: a comprehensive species-metabolite relationship database.' Plant Metabolomics. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2006. 165-181.