Canmetcon
General Information
NameBrassicas
Scientific NameNot Available
DescriptionBrassica is a genus of plants in the mustard family. The members of the genus are collectively known as cruciferous vegetables, cabbages, or mustards. Crops from this genus are sometimes called cole crops, which is derived from the Latin caulis, meaning stem or cabbage. Common types of brassica used for food include cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and some types of seeds. The genus is known for containing many important agricultural and horticultural crops. It also includes a number of weeds, both wild taxa and escapees from cultivation. It includes over 30 wild species and hybrids, and numerous additional cultivars and hybrids of cultivated origin. Most are annuals or biennials, but some are small shrubs. Due to their agricultural importance, Brassica plants have been the subject of much scientific interest. Six particularly important species (Brassica carinata, B. juncea, B. oleracea, B. napus, B. nigra and B. rapa) are derived by combining the chromosomes from three earlier species, as described by the Triangle of U theory. The genus is native in the wild in western Europe, the Mediterranean and temperate regions of Asia. In addition to the cultivated species, which are grown worldwide, many of the wild species grow as weeds, especially in North America, South America, and Australia. A dislike for cabbage, broccoli et. al. can be due to the Brassica species containing a chemical similar to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), a chemical which is either bitter or tasteless depending on one's genetic makeup.
PictureNot Available
Classification
GroupVegetables
Sub-GroupBrassicas
Taxonomy
LineageSuperkingdom: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Viridiplantae
Phylum: Streptophyta
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Tribe: Brassiceae
Genus: Brassica
ITIS IDNot Available
Wikipedia IDBrassica
Composition
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Nutrients
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References
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