General Information
NamePort wine
Scientific NameNot Available
DescriptionPort wine (also known as Vinho do Porto, Portuguese pronunciation: [ˌviɲuduˈpoɾtu], Porto, and usually simply port) is a Portuguese fortified wine produced exclusively in the Douro Valley in the northern provinces of Portugal. It is typically a sweet, red wine, often served as a dessert wine though it also comes in dry, semi-dry, and white varieties. Fortified wines in the style of port are also produced outside Portugal, most notably in Australia, South Africa, Canada, India, Argentina, and the United States. Under European Union Protected Designation of Origin guidelines, only the product from Portugal may be labelled as port or Porto. In the United States, wines labelled "port" may come from anywhere in the world, while the names "Oporto", "Porto", and "Vinho do Porto" have been recognised as foreign, non-generic names for Port wines originating in Portugal. Under European Union Protected Designation of Origin guidelines, only the product from Portugal may be labelled as port or Porto.[2] In the United States, wines labelled "port" may come from anywhere in the world,[3] while the names "Oporto", "Porto", and "Vinho do Porto" have been recognised as foreign, non-generic names for Port wines originating in Portugal. Port wine is typically richer, sweeter, heavier, and higher in alcohol content than unfortified wines. This is caused by the addition of distilled grape spirits (aguardente similar to brandy) to fortify the wine and halt fermentation before all the sugar is converted to alcohol, and results in a wine that is usually 19 to 20% alcohol. Port is commonly served after meals as a dessert wine in English-speaking countries, often with cheese, nuts or chocolate; white and tawny ports are often served as an apéritif. In Europe all types of port are frequently consumed as aperitifs.[Wikipedia].
Primary IDFOOD00630
Picture647
Classification
GroupBeverages
Sub-GroupFortified wines
Taxonomy
Lineage
ITIS IDNot Available
Wikipedia IDPort_wine
Composition
Compounds
CompoundStructureContent Range AverageReference
CompoundReference
Macronutrients
MacronutrientContent Range AverageReference
NutrientReference
References
Content Reference— Saxholt, E., et al. 'Danish food composition databank, revision 7.' Department of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark (2008).